How is EFT Tapping different from Counseling?

By August 30, 2019Blog

This is a commonly asked question!

How Is EFT Different from Counseling or “Talk” Therapy?⁠

There is a physical (somatic) aspect to EFT along with the cognitive (thinking) part. Most traditional approaches to changing behavior or dealing with emotional issues, such as counseling or therapy, involve a “talk” component and rely heavily on changing people’s thoughts. This is fine for some people, but others get frustrated that their thoughts just don’t change. It may even be hard to recognize the thoughts that need changing.⁠

Does this sound familiar? ⁠

Because EFT just starts with what is bothering you and doesn’t try and change it up front, you get to truly acknowledge what is wrong. Some traditional therapies analyze your thoughts and attempt to “correct” them, but this takes a lot of willpower and effort. It doesn’t come easily to most (I know this after working with clients for more than 20 years) and it takes a long time for a change to become habitual and permanent.⁠

What if you could just acknowledge what is not feeling good, not feeling right in your life, a distressing thought or body sensation, and use the technique until it subsides? Nothing more than that—just focusing on it, using the tapping techniques, and feeling better/neutral/calm at the end.⁠

Now that might be a great idea! To learn more, feel free to explore our Ultimate Tapping Guide here.

Access Chapter 4 from The Science Behind Tapping here free

EFT researcher and author Peta Stapleton, Ph.D., brings together the history and cutting-edge research of tapping. She also shows how tapping can be used for a whole host of ailments, including anxiety, weight issues, depression, trauma, and more. Dr. Stapleton’s own groundbreaking study involving food cravings in overweight adults helped establish EFT as an effective, valid form of therapy.

Access Chapter 4 below - EFT Tapping for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Thank you! Here is your free chapter.